Powder & Bulk Solids is part of the Informa Markets Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Bartlett Plans New $325M Soy Crush Plant in Midwest

Image courtesy of Bartlett Bartlett-grain-facility-600x399.png
The facility in Montgomery County, KS will have a handling capacity of 38.5 million bu of soybeans a year.

Grain supplier Bartlett will start work next year on a new, $325 million soybean crush plant in Montgomery County, KS after officials with the Board of County Commissioners of Montgomery County recently approved industrial revenue bonds to assist the development, the firm’s owner, Savage Co., announced Tuesday.

Once operational, the facility will have a handling capacity of 38.5 million bu/yr of soybeans, which will be crushed into soybean meal and refined soybean oil, for the renewable fuels, food, and animal feed industries. The location’s processing capacity is expected to reach about 110,000 bu/day.

“This is an important milestone for our project, enabling infrastructure investment in Kansas that accelerates the nation’s transition to a cleaner, greener and more sustainable transportation system,” Bob Knief, president of Bartlett, said in a release. “We appreciate the County Commissioners’ recognition of the long-term benefits this plant will provide by expanding markets for area producers and agribusinesses and driving economic growth in Montgomery County and Southeast Kansas. With strong demand for soybean products, we look forward to our crushing facility supporting farming families in the Midwest and playing a vital role in multiple supply chains including renewable diesel production.”

Bartlett intends to start building the site in 2022 and commence operations by 2024.

Hide comments
account-default-image

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish